EMMA AYLIFFE

From the bush to the bread on your dining table, 2015 GRDC Grains Young Farming Champion Emma Ayliffe lives to grow the fibre-packed grains that help Aussies stay strong and healthy. After growing up on a station two hours from Coober Pedy, South Australia, studying agricultural science at the University of Adelaide was natural progression for Emma. Work lead her to a role in broadacre agronomy in the Clare Valley before taking on an agronomy role at the unique lake-bed cropping operation of Lake Tandou, part of the Menindee Lakes system, in far-western NSW.

“We mainly grow cotton and wheat, but you name it, we’ve tried it!” says 24-year-old Emma, whose role covers everything from crop rotation and nutrition, to irrigation management, ordering supplies, coordinating departments on the farm, operating machinery and playing tour guide to farm visitors. “I love the diversity of my job,” Emma says. “I go to work and never know where I’m going to end up. Agriculture has taken me so far out of my comfort zone and I couldn’t be happier.”

READ EMMA'S BLOG POST HERE


HUGH BURRELL

2015 GRDC Grains Young Farming Champion Hugh Burrell just loves growing things: “Growing anything – animals, crops, I don’t mind – it’s all fun to me!” A proud product of Narrabri, NSW, Hugh has a strong bond with the land of his childhood home. On a 4th generation family farm in the foothills of the Nandewar ranges, Hugh learnt about growing the “wheat in your wheatbix and the barley for your beer” under the wings of his father and grandfather and always with a poddy calf in tow.

Currently in his final year of agricultural science at University of Sydney, Hugh’s looking forward to getting back to the land soon where he can “wake up with the view that feeds you.”

“In the future I’d like to move into agronomy of grains to feed the growing human population and the livestock industry,” Hugh says. “And as a farmer I will take the best care of my crops and animals, producing products you are happy to take into your home to eat, wear and use.”

READ HUGH'S BLOG POST HERE


DANIEL FOX

Fifth generation farmer Daniel Fox’s family has been farming in the Marrar district of NSW for more than eighty years. It’s all hands on deck at his family’s sheep and dryland cropping property, with three generations of men and women always at the ready to help out. Daniel recently graduated from Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, with a double degree in Science and Education, and is happy to be back home on the farm.

“Now I have graduated from University, I look forward to the exciting next stage in my life where I can begin to take a greater role in the management of the family farm, as well as taking every opportunity to raise awareness about how we farm, why we do it and why we love it.”

READ DANIEL'S BLOG POST HERE


DIANA GEORGE

Diana George believes nothing in life can beat getting on the header during harvest – especially when you have a great season! Based near Nevertire, NSW, Diana’s family run a dry-land cropping operation, alongside small herds of Angus cattle and Dorper sheep. Keen to try her hand at all things ag related, Diana has won numerous awards for judging cattle and handlers classes, and she is also qualified to pregnancy test and artificially inseminate cattle. Last year Diana took out the 2013 Rob Seekamp Memorial Scholarship and in 2014 an RAS of NSW Foundation Scholarship and a Coca-Cola and the Australian Council of Agricultural Societies Scholarship. She’s currently in her final year of a Bachelor of Agriculture at UNE.

“Agriculture is a part of who I am, I wouldn’t be the same without it. I am a farmer’s daughter and very proud to be part of the next generation of female farmers!”

READ DIANA'S BLOG POST HERE


JESSICA KIRKPATRICK

Meet Jessica Kirkpatrick, a 19-year-old university student, grain analyst and stud sheep breeder. Jessica’s family has been farming near Beaufort, Victoria, for 150 years. At just 12 years old, Jessica established her own Border Leicester stud, “Jessie James”, in partnership with her younger brother. For four months of the year Jessica works as grain sampler and manager of classification and the sampling arm, at the Lakaput Bulk Storage facility for wheat, barley, oats and canola. With aspirations for a career as a grains agronomist, Jessica is currently studying a Bachelor of Agricultural Science in Wagga Wagga.

"We know how good our industry is so we must show it off to others! When work, commitment, and pleasure all become one and you reach that deep well where passion lives, nothing is impossible.”

READ JESSICA'S BLOG POST HERE


REBECCA THISTLETHWAITE

From the beach to the bush, Rebecca Thistlethwaite believes all young people should experience the pleasure of a day of life on a farm. Growing up in Sydney’s Sutherland Shire, Rebecca’s love of agriculture grew from visiting her family’s hobby farm on weekends and holidays. Rebecca is currently based in Narrabri, undertaking her PhD with the help of a Grains Research and Development Postgraduate Scholarship to study plant breeding and genetics at the University of Sydney.

“Did you know that wheat is the staple food of almost half the world’s population and approximately 30,000 farmers grow wheat in Australia? It’s no wonder I saw this as a fast-moving field I wanted to get involved in as soon as I could.”

READ REBECCA'S BLOG POST HERE

READ ABOUT REBECCA IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


SAM COGGINS

Canberra based Sam Croggins has family connections with the land but it was a speech by Dr Julian Cribb at high school that spurred him to forge a career in agriculture. “He convinced me that with a growing world population, climatic instability and dwindling natural resources, global food security is under imminent threat and preserving it will be the challenge of our generation,” Sam says. “This enabled me to realise the crucial importance of agricultural science and that I can use it as a mechanism to create a significant difference in the world.”

Already with many accolades under his belt Sam is studying at The University of Sydney and is determined to change the world. “21,000 people die of hunger related causes every day. This is a number that is only set to increase and one that I am not prepared to live with. I am determined to play a leading role in the prevention of a global food shortage.”

READ SAM'S BLOG POST HERE


TAYLA FIELD

Sydney girl Tayla Field first became involved with environmental issues while at high school and carried this interest to an Environmental Systems degree at The University of Sydney. Here she mixed with peers from an agricultural background and so impressed was she with the potential of the food and fibre industry that she changed to a Bachelor of Agricultural Science in her second year.

“I have discovered agriculture is an exciting forward-thinking career and I am hooked!” Tayla says enthusiastically. “I am hooked on the innovation and technology, the wonderful people I meet and the prospect of a career in an industry that underpins a bright and sustainable future for Australia.”

Now understanding the environment and agriculture work hand in hand for a common goal in protecting the planet, Tayla is majoring in agronomy.

READ TAYLA'S BLOG POST HERE


MARLEE LANGFIELD

Cowra girl Marlee Langfield is on a trajectory to take over her family farm and educate the next generation about agriculture. Gaining her passion from her father, from a school year in Canada and from the realisation that live theatre was a valuable means of communicating her ideas, Marlee is quickly gaining the skills she will require in the future.

“Every day I am equipping myself through my studies, practical hands-on experiences and with the help of industry experts to ready myself for the time when I become “Wallaringa” owner and manager,” Marlee says, “and my objective is to raise my voice to promote a rural lifestyle, educate non-farmers and encourage younger generations to consider apprenticeships and traineeships in agriculture, which therefore inspires them to enter into this vibrant, flourishing and promising industry.”

READ MARLEE'S BLOG POST HERE


CALUM WATT

Studying a Masters Degree of Agricultural Science at The University of Western Australia, Calum Watt is breeding a better barley for your beer.

Growing up on hobby farms he soon realised his agricultural interests lay in plants, especially crops, rather than animals and meeting friends at university he soon developed “broadacre” envy. “Understanding that the nature of farming is changing for good or worse made me want to integrate genetics and crops so that I could become a crop breeder,” Sam says.

His thesis is looking at aluminium toxicity in crops from a genetic perspective. “No doubt you’re already watering at the mouth at the thought of a cold barley made frothy and it’s in my interest to make sure that aluminium isn’t a factor in depriving you of the opportunity.”

READ CALUM'S BLOG POST HERE


CASEY ONUS

Tamworth agronomist Casey Onus attended her first grains meeting on the day she was born and grew up identifying plants in exchange for lollies in the vast cropping fields of Moree.

Prior to completion of her Bachelor of Agriculture at UNE Casey was accepted into the Landmark Graduate Agronomy Program. “Today I am working with a great group of farmers from all backgrounds as well as providing tailored agronomic advice, precision agriculture services such as NDVI imagery, variable rate maps, capacitance probes and everything in between.”

“They say ‘Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life’ and I firmly believe they are talking about jobs in Australian Agriculture, because I certainly haven’t worked a day in my life yet.”

READ CASEY'S BLOG POST HERE


KEILEY O’BRIEN

Keiley O’Brien spent a great deal of her childhood in the cab of her father’s truck, carting grain and livestock across central NSW. Always excited about agriculture she was running her own Murray Grey Stud before she left school and envisaged a career in the beef industry.

But then a teacher encouraged her to try grain judging: “I knew what grain was, where it came from and that dad carted it, but that was it,” Keiley admits. “Never in the world did I think I could ever judge it, but I did. And that’s where my grain story begins.”

Success in grain judging and harvest employment with Graincorp has set Keiley up for a career in grains. She is currently studying a Bachelor of Agriculture/Bachelor of Business at UNE.

READ KEILEY'S BLOG POST HERE


TIM EYES

Tim was always the ‘the country boy stuck on concrete,” growing up on the NSW Central Coast. Attending Tocal Ag College from year 10 saw him realise his dreams, studying and working in agriculture in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. At 19 years old he started his own farm consultation and management business. Two years later, Tim manages two commercial beef properties, a Charolais stud show cattle team, and his own poultry business.

“I am very proud to be part of this important industry and playing my part in helping farmers adapt their farming practices to suit the soil and climate of their farms, and the changing climate conditions.”

READ TIM'S BLOG POST HERE READ TIM'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE

READ ABOUT TIM IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


CASEY DAHL

Casey grew up on a cattle property near Baralaba, Central Queensland. But it took a gap year working at an English boarding school for the realisation to hit: her calling was back home, working in agriculture. Currently in her final year of a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at the University of Queensland, Casey is about to embark on her honours project researching preservation of bovine semen.

“We need to share how wonderful agriculture is, how beautiful the land is, and how passionate we are about it. It doesn’t matter what part each of us take, we need to remember that working together is by far the most effective way.”

READ CASEY'S BLOG POST HERE READ CASEY'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE


PRUE CAPP

Prue’s love for agriculture started in the Hunter Valley on her family’s beef cattle and stockhorse-breeding property. With a Bachelor of Agribusiness under her belt, Prue is also a qualified equine dentist, running her own business while studying Veterinary Science at Charles Sturt University. She is an Australian Stock Horse judge and youth committee co-founder, and is highly involved with her local and state Agricultural Society Councils. Last year Prue was named the 2013 Trans-Tasman National Rural Ambassador.

As a young agriculturalist, I believe education is the key to the future of the agricultural industry and by further study I will be able to contribute to its future… I believe in the future of farming and the sustainability of agriculture, and I thrive on the opportunity to be an ambassador for agriculture.”

READ PRUE'S BLOG POST HERE READ PRUE'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE


JOSH GILBERT

Despite growing up around wheat and sheep near Boorowa, NSW, Josh’s interest in agriculture started on his Great Grandparent’s dairy and beef cattle farms on the Mid North Coast. Currently in his final year of a law degree, Josh is completing a finance cadetship at the ABC, but his dream is to provide high quality legal advice to those living in the country, while building a large scale agricultural corporation. Josh is a Chair of the NSW Farmers- Young Farmers Council and part of the Alumni of the prestigious Woolworths Agriculture Business Scholarship program.

“We have a real chance to make these dreams a reality. We have the opportunity to make the agricultural profession as reputable and important to others as it once was. It won’t be easy, it will require a cohesive and collaborative mindset but the rewards will be great.”

READ JOSH'S BLOG POST HERE READ JOSH'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE

READ ABOUT JOSH IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


GEOFF BIRCHNELL

Geoff’s dream of becoming a farmer was realised at 9 years old, when his family moved from the city to a cattle property near Tamworth. His family operate a cattle stud, a commercial beef cattle herd, and grow seasonal fodder crops. Now a chartered accountant in Brisbane by day, Geoff’s love for agriculture still consumes his weekends. His career highlight to date came when his stud bull Avignon Absolute was crowned 2011 Grand Champion of Sydney Royal Easter Show.

“Enabling the next generation of farmers to feed the world sustainably requires knowledge, adoption and implementation of both existing and new technologies, and paddock to plate collaboration and training. It is my mission to ensure that I continue to grow, learn and share my knowledge and skills with my peers…”

READ GEOFF'S BLOG POST HERE READ GEOFF'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE

READ ABOUT GEOFF IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


ANIKA MOLESWORTH

In far western NSW, near Broken Hill, Anika’s family run Dorper sheep for the prime lamb market. After high school Anika jillarooed on large scale beef properties across Queensland, before completing a Bachelor of Science (Agribusiness) at Charles Sturt University, followed by her Masters in Sustainable Agriculture. Now an agribusiness banker with Suncorp Bank in the Riverina region of Griffith, Anika loves being able to work across a wide range of farming industries, though her heart lies with lamb.

“I have a great passion for and strong personal investment in Australia’s sheep meat industry, and hope to inspire others to embrace the diverse and rewarding opportunities that this industry has to offer. We need ambitious and innovative people who see past the status quo to embrace sustainable farming now and into the future.”

READ ANIKA'S BLOG POST HERE READ ANIKA'S TARGET 100 PROFILE HERE

READ ABOUT ANIKA IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


JASMINE NIXON

“My passion is agriculture and I am proud to say I love my beef cows! Every day I know that I am contributing to help feed the world – and I also love what I do. Agriculture is an exciting place to be, yes there are challenges but there are also endless different opportunities within agriculture and that is something I hope to share and encourage a new generation to take on the challenge to help feed the world!”

READ JASMINE'S BLOG POST HERE


HANNAH BARBER

“Education is the key to ensuring the Australian agricultural industry is understood and supported by our urban cousins and I look forward to a career where I can achieve this, and then come home to the farm every evening.”

READ HANNAH'S BLOG POST HERE WATCH HANNAH'S VIDEO HERE


DANILLE FOX

“I see today’s agricultural industry as exciting and challenging and I feel privileged to be a part of an industry which is so vital to Australia’s future. I look forward to contributing to the industry through my veterinary profession and AGvoccay roles.”

READ DANILLE'S BLOG POST HERE


NAOMI HOBSON

“It doesn’t matter what your background may be all you need is enthusiasm, a willingness to learn and the ability to say yes to the opportunities that are presented to you and I guarantee a great adventure will be waiting! After all, as Dorothea wrote… Core of my heart, my country! Land of the Rainbow Gold, For flood and fire and famine, She pays us back threefold.”

READ NAOMI'S BLOG POST HERE


STEPHANIE FOWLER

Steph grew up on the Central Coast of New South Wales in a small coastal suburb, Green Point. A decision to study agriculture in high school created a passion for showing cattle and in 2012 she started a PhD in Meat and Livestock Science, with a project that is looking at the potential of Raman Spectroscopy in predicting meat quality.

“When I was growing up I never dreamed that I would end up joining an incredibly rewarding, innovative and exciting industry that would take me across the country and around the world.”

READ STEPH'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW STEPH'S VIDEO HERE


BRONWYN ROBERTS

Bronwyn is a Grazing Land Management Officer with the Fitzroy Basin Association. Her family has a long association with the cattle industry in Queensland and her parents currently run a 5500 acre cattle property near Capella.

“I believe consumers have lost touch of how and where their food and fibre is produced. In these current times where agriculture is competing with other industry for land use, labour, funding and services, it is important that we have a strong network of consumers who support the industry and accept our social license as the trusted and sustainable option.”

READ BRONWYN'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW BRONWYN'S VIDEO HERE HEAR BRONWYN ON THE RADIO HERE

READ ABOUT BRONWYN IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


KYLIE STRETTON

Kylie Stretton and her husband have a livestock business in Northern Queensland, where they also run Brahman cattle. Kylie is the co-creator of “Ask An Aussie Farmer” a social media hub for people to engage with farmers and learn about food and fibre production.

“The industry has advanced from the images of “Farmer Joe” in the dusty paddock to images of young men and women from diverse backgrounds working in a variety of professions. Images now range from a hands-on job in the dusty red centre to an office job in inner city Sydney. So many opportunities, so many choices.”

READ KYLIE'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW KYLIE'S VIDEO HERE


JAMES KANALEY

“Turning a patch of dirt into your cotton shirt,” is 2015 Cotton Australia Young Farming Champion James Kanaley’s motto. Originally from a sheep and cropping farm near Junee, James says his biggest teacher and influence in life was his father. James studied agronomy and livestock production at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, and is now a consultant agronomist around Moree, where his office is a Hilux ute.

James has travelled and worked in agriculture through Vietnam and the US, where he says the differences in technology, infrastructure, adaptation and innovation are notable, but the fundamentals of farming are the same.

Over the past three years he has been working with a software developer to create a farm management application to help agronomists, farm managers and businesses.

“I work with more than 40 growers and no two growers or farms are the same,” James says. “The most rewarding part of my job is learning from farmers – I enjoy building relationships with growers and seeing the emotion that goes into the decision making processes of growing healthy and productive food and fibre crops.”

READ JAMES' BLOG POST HERE


ANDREA CROTHERS

Cotton Australia Young Farming Champion 2015, Andrea Crothers, is a rural journalist with more than 150 years of farming blood in her veins. Now based in Brisbane, Andrea says she was virtually raised in the back of a tractor among fields of “cropping’s white gold” on her family’s property near Dirranbandi, Queensland.

Between boarding school and studying journalism at university, Andrea worked on a number of cotton properties including a stint on Australia’s largest producer Cubbie Station. While on uni holidays she worked under a local agronomist during bug checking season and interned at the local newspaper. Internships across south-east Queensland in both television and print media lead to her current role with one of the state’s leading agricultural news outlets.

“Working as a rural reporter has further ignited my passion for agriculture and rural Australia,” Andrea says. “It has granted me a position to interact with all areas of the industry. What I have learnt so far is driving my ambition to make rural news a greater part of mainstream media… which means finding those great stories within the agricultural industries and sharing them.”

READ ANDREA'S BLOG POST HERE


LAURA BENNETT

The cotton fields of western NSW are a long way from Laura’s seaside childhood on the Mid North Coast, where she grew up growing beef and bananas. Laura was “captivated by everything cotton” after a summer working on a cotton property in Narrabri. So much so, that she swapped her coveted place in a Veterinary Science degree at Charles Sturt University, to a Bachelor of Agricultural Science. Still studying and having just finished her second summer of bug checking cotton bolls, Laura says her passion and love for the cotton is endless.

“I want to be part of the young generation of agriculturalists that are responsible for changing the face of agriculture in the community and reconnecting farmers and the people who eat their produce and wear the fibres they grow.”

READ LAURA'S BLOG POST HERE


DWAYNE SCHUBERT

Dwayne believes life is too short to not have a crack at something you’re passionate about. And it seems the mantra has served this Gunnedah based agronomist very well. Following his school years on the NSW Mid North Coast, Dwayne studied a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at Charles Sturt University. During his time at CSU Dwayne travelled to Vietnam – an experience he says highlighted just how important agriculture is to countries all around the world – and to New Zealand as part of the Grain Growers Australian University Crops Competition. Since graduating, Dwayne has spent the last three years planning, preparing and managing cotton crops for growers in NSW’s upper Namoi.

“In a world where information sharing is often only the touch of a button away, sharing the stories of the people behind the clothes we wear and the food we eat is becoming a lost art… I am passionate about sharing how rewarding my career is with the wider community…”

READ DWAYNE'S BLOG POST HERE


NAOMI MULLIGAN

Naomi is a third generation cotton grower whose love for the industry began on her family’s property near Moree, NSW. From her very first tractor driving shifts at age 12, Naomi is now proud to be highly involved in every aspect of preparing and planting her family’s cotton crop. Currently working full time on a cattle and cropping property at Croppa Creek, NSW, Naomi is also completing her first year of tertiary agriculture studies via correspondence.

“It’s easy to see why people who aren’t fortunate enough to grow up the way I did often struggle to understand the role of agriculture in today’s society. But I believe my firsthand experience and knowledge, from growing up on the front line, gives me the ability to educate and inspire others.”

READ NAOMI'S BLOG POST HERE


ALEXANDER STEPHEN

Goondiwindi cotton farmer Alexander Stephen spent his childhood surrounded by cotton and obsessed with machinery. At 18 he graduated from the Australian Agriculture College with a Diploma in Agriculture. Alexander worked in farmhand and caretaker roles in southern Queensland before heading overseas, working with a harvest contractor across the US. Since his return to the Australian cotton industry in 2012, Alexander has worked on an irrigated cotton/dryland grain farming property near Goondiwindi. He’s currently completing a Diploma in Cotton Production, through the University of New England.

“… It is essential that we as a growing community aspire to build on our high achieving attributes. That’s why I see that it is very important to build relationships outside the farming community, to show how professional Australian farmers are generate pride in the community and abroad for what they grow and produce.”

READ ALEXANDER'S BLOG POST HERE


MARTIN MURRAY

Art4Agriculture Cotton Young Farming Champion Martin Murray’s childhood on a rice and sheep farm in the NSW Riverina sparked a love for farming that has evolved into a career in cotton. While at boarding school in Sydney, Martin’s school holidays were spent working on a cotton farm near Moree. After high school he worked on a cattle station in the Northern Territory before undertaking a Rural Science degree at University Of New England. Now back in the Riverina managing an irrigated cotton farm Martin says, “My major goal is to own and run my own mixed cattle and cropping property, while continuing to promote agriculture and bridging the rural urban divide.” In his spare time Martin blogs on The Farming Game. Last year he rode a postie bike from Moree, NSW, to Broome, WA, raising more than $10,000 for charity Aussie Helpers.

“Bringing the farm to schools and introducing students to young farmers is a great way to… not only help build awareness of and interest in agriculture but also help create a new generation of agricultural-savvy Australians.”

READ MARTIN'S BLOG POST HERE

READ ABOUT MARTIN IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


BEN EGAN

"It’s my passion, my job, it’s my life!” says Art4Agriculture Cotton Young Farming Champion Ben Egan. A 6th generation farmer from central west NSW, Ben’s family farm grazes around 700 cattle and grows sorghum, wheat, canola and chick peas, but their main crop is cotton. At boarding school in Sydney Ben says he was “astonished at how little some of the city boys knew about life on a farm and living in the country.” After school he spent 12 months working in England before returning to Australia to work at Eva Downs and Camfield Station in the Northern Territory. Ben has a Bachelor of Business (Farm Management) from Marcus Oldham College and now works back home, involved in all aspects of planting, managing and harvesting, and is currently implementing improved irrigation methods.

“Where are all the young farmers? We’re here, we just need to be heard and be given a chance,” Ben says. “I challenge the young people of today to put their hand up and be heard, ask questions, challenge the status quo, support our farmers and just have a go!”

READ BEN'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW BEN'S VIDEO HERE

READ ABOUT BEN IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


KIRSTY McCORMACK

Art4Agriculture Cotton Young Farming Champion Kirsty McCormack has been immersed in rural life ever since she can remember. Growing up on 75acres in NSW’s New England region, she was a lover of horses, camp drafting and polocrosse, though she dreamed of being a lawyer. A timetable clash during high school forced Kirsty to study Agriculture – and she loved it! Thanks to industry sponsorship Kirsty attended the biannual Cotton Australia Cotton Conference where she was “blown away by the innovation, eagerness and pride that everyone there exuded about their passion – cotton. I came home all hyped on information, thinking about all the possibilities that this little plant had to offer me.” Kirsty is currently studying a Bachelor of Rural Science at University of New England and spends her holidays bug checking and nutrition sampling cotton crops across NSW.

“When I finish my Rural Science degree I would like to complete a diploma of education to inspire other students the way my agricultural teacher did.”

READ KIRSTY'S BLOG POST HERE


ELIZABETH LOBSEY

Liz Lobsey isn’t from a typical farming background and though the 2014 Art4Agriculture Cotton Young Farming Champion’s family connection to the land is minimal, she says “My passion for the industry is enormous!” An agronomist based in Toowoomba, Qld, and a keen agricultural advocate, Liz was introduced to agriculture during high school. Though she first thought agriculture was dirty and boring, Liz soon learned there was a lot more under the surface! Now she works with innovative, inspiring and passionate people every day, assisting growers to make decisions about how to nurture their crops to produce the best yields with the lowest production costs and minimum impact to the environment.

“When I think about agriculture I think about people, I think about innovation, I think about passion and commitment,” Liz says. “There is so much more involved with working on a farm or within the industry than what appears on the surface. The passion of the people in this industry is infectious and the resilience of the people in this industry its own life lesson.”

READ ELIZABETH'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW ELIZABETH'S VIDEO HERE


TAMSIN QUIRK

Tamsin grew up in Moree but is not from a farm. An enthusiastic teacher at high school who encouraged the students to better understand the natural world sparked Tamsin’s interest in agriculture. She is now studying agricultural science at the University of New England.

“Growing up in Moree has shown me is how important it is to have young people in the industry with a fiery passion and a desire to educate those who aren’t fully aware of the valuable role our farmers play in feeding and clothing not only Australians but many other people around the world.”

READ TAMSIN'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW TAMSIN'S VIDEO HERE


BILLY BROWNING

Billy Browning grew up in the small town of Narromine located in the central west of NSW. He is the third generation to be farming on the family property ‘Narramine Station’ located on the Macquarie River. They grow wheat, canola, cotton and corn depending on the seasonal conditions and availability of water.

“My love for agriculture has grown via the farm and studying agriculture at school where I became fascinated by the science and technology that underpins the sector. I work full-time on the farm when I am home. I am involved in all operations, irrigation, harvest, picking, spraying, earth-moving, sowing and general farm maintenance. This has led me to realise the important relationship between farm inputs and outputs and why smart business thinking is the key to sustainable farming. This realisation has lead me to studying agricultural economics at the University of Sydney. Although I haven’t decided on what part of the industry I want to end up in, I know that I am trying to make the most of the opportunities out there and taking on everything along the way I hope by sharing my story it will show you like me you can have a bright future in the agriculture sector. I encourage those with an interest or even a niggling to go and ask questions as many questions as you would like There are plenty of people wanting to help.”


RICHARD QUIGLEY

Richie is a fifth-generation farmer at Trangie in central-western NSW. He is currently studying a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at the University of Sydney and in the long term, intends to return to the family farm, a 6000-hectare mixed-cropping, cotton and livestock operation.

“It’s fantastic to help people understand how their food and fibre is produced and to represent the agricultural industry. Most of the students I talked to are from the city so they haven’t been exposed to agriculture on the kind of scale we work on.”

READ RICHARD'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW RICHARD'S VIDEO HERE


SHARNA HOLMAN

Becoming involved with The Archibull Prize while still at high school was one of the reasons Sydneysider Sharna Holman chose a career in agriculture. Five years later Sharna has a Bachelor of Agriculture from The University of Sydney and is working in her dream job as a cotton extension officer in Emerald, QLD – 16 hours and a world away from her previous life in Sydney – and she has never been happier.

“I am so lucky to be involved in an industry where the growers, researchers and industry members are incredibly innovative and passionate,” Sharna says. “The cotton industry is constantly trying to look for new ways to be sustainable and efficient while remaining productive and every day I look forward to helping growers.” Sharna is living proof that anyone, no matter their background, can find a role they love within Australia’s agricultural industry.

READ SHARNA'S BLOG POST HERE


DIONE HOWARD

Sixth generation farmer and third year veterinary student Dione Howard is a 2015 Australian Wool Innovation Young Farming Champion. Born into a farming family in the NSW Riverina, Dione inherited her father and grandfather’s enthusiasm for sheep and wool through the family’s 80 year old merino stud.

Loving a challenge, Dione pursued a veterinary degree at Charles Sturt University and aspires to work toward the best possible sustainable, social and economical methods of animal production.

She has worked with companies such as pork producers Rivalea, poultry producers Baiada and beef cattle genetics producers Rennylea Angus, participated in the Intercollegiate Meat Judging Competition and the National Merino Challenge, and is currently completing her wool classing certificate. During university holidays Dione has worked for Agfarm grain brokers, giving her a special insight into the supply chain of grain from farmers’ paddocks to its destinations across Australia and the world.

“What I’ve realised about agriculture is that everyone is connected,” Dione says. “If you eat food, you make decisions every day that affect Australia’s farmers. That’s why I believe agricultural engagement is so important.”

READ DIONE'S BLOG POST HERE


PETA BRADLEY

Peta Bradley was drawn to the excitement of stock work on her family’s sheep and cereal cropping property near Armatree, Central West NSW, from a young age. During high school she became involved in sheep showing and judging, successfully competing in the biggest sheep shows across Australia. Last year she became the youngest member appointed to the Australian Stud Sheep Breeder’s Association NSW judging panels. Peta is currently in her first year of a Bachelor of Animal Science in Armidale.

“The passion that the land imprints upon you will leave you longing for the rolling hills or the flat, open, golden plains. We must harness this passion and combine it with the new technologies to prepare ourselves for the promising, productive future of Australian agriculture.”

READ PETA'S BLOG POST HERE


EMMA TURNER

Sixth generation wool producer Emma Turner grew up on her family’s Merino sheep station south of Ivanhoe, western NSW. Loving animals is just part of the job for Emma, who’s always accompanied by pet dogs and poddy lambs. And they’ve inspired her to study a Bachelor of Agriculture Science after her gap year. “My dream is to study genetics and the role it could play in breeding a hardier, more drought resistant Merino,” Emma says.

“I believe the long term future of the Australian agriculture sector relies on farmers and the community working together. Fresh ideas and innovative solutions are needed to start building these partnerships and I am doing what I have always done, and that is putting my hand up to be on the team.”

READ EMMA'S BLOG POST HERE


TOM TOURLE

Dubbo based Tom Tourle admits to being the very same “bike riding, animal loving, pliers wielding” kind of guy he was as a kid. He’s got a thirst for education, completing stock handling and marketing courses fresh out of high school, before heading to North Queensland as a cattle station ringer. In 2013 Tom completed Certificate III & IV in Agriculture, a wool classing course, and his training and education certificate. When he’s not teaching at Western College, Tom’s starting his own grazing enterprise while working full time at the family farm.

“Everything I’m doing is taking me to where I need to be. Where that utopia might be, I have no idea, but I’m pretty sure it involves me, on our property, surrounded by healthy animals, lots of grass, on a bike and with a big smile on my face, just like when I was a kid.”

READ TOM'S BLOG POST HERE


PAT MORGAN

Patrick Morgan is a fifth generation sheep and cropping farmer, a professional wool classer and a university student. For now he’s focussed on completing a Bachelor of Agricultural Business Management in Wagga Wagga. But Patrick grabs every opportunity to travel home Colbinabbin, Victoria, to help his grandfather, father and five brothers run the family farm. Patrick says, “if the rest of the farming community is anything like me, they take a great deal of satisfaction of succeeding in this occupation.”

“For me a career in agriculture is the ultimate goal. To plant a seed and watch it grow and be harvested to feed many. To nurture a new born lamb and gather its wool to clothe others. To have the opportunity to share my story and showcase how good our agriculture sector is. I believe it’s a career and a goal second to none.”

READ PAT'S BLOG POST HERE


LAUREN CROTHERS

Lauren is passionate about the wool industry and spent her gap year on a remote sheep station in Western NSW increasing her hands-on knowledge. Lauren is now studying a Bachelor of Agribusiness at the University of Queensland.

“Every family needs a farmer. No matter who you are, your gender, your background or where you live you can become involved in this amazing industry.”

READ LAUREN'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW LAUREN'S VIDEO HERE


STEPHANIE GRILLS

Steph Grills’ family has been farming in the New England Tablelands since 1881 and the original family farm remains in the family to this day. Steph is combining a career on the farm with her four sisters with a Bachelor of Livestock Science at the University of New England.

“I believe the future for Australian agriculture will be very bright. I am excited to be part of an innovative industry that is leading the world in technology and adapting it on a practical level. I’m very proud to say that Agriculture has been passed down over nine known generations and spans over three centuries just in my family. My hope is that this continues, and that the future generations can be just as proud as I am that they grow world-class food and fibre. I also hope by sharing my story I can inspire other young people to follow me into an agricultural career.”

READ STEPH'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW STEPH'S VIDEO HERE


SAMANTHA TOWNSEND

Sammi is passionate about encouraging young people to explore careers in agriculture and has a website and blog www.youthinagtionaustralia.com where she showcases the diversity of opportunities. In 2012 Sammi commenced studying Agricultural Business Management at Charles Sturt University in Orange.

“I have found that being an Art4Ag YFC has helped my University this year. This was my first year at University and my first time out there and finding my feet. Taking on this role helped give me a lot of confidence and it has also broadened my own knowledge about my own industry. It is amazing how many things you take for granted until you have to tell someone about them! I was elected President of the Ag Club at Uni in the middle of the year and it is a role I thought I never would have had the confidence to take on. With the opportunities I have been given this year through Art4Ag, I have a new-found confidence to have a go at tackling anything.”

READ SAMMI'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW SAMMI'S VIDEO HERE


BESSIE BLORE

Former television news journalist, Queensland-born Bessie Blore has been farming in far west NSW with her husband for two years. Approaching agriculture with fresh eyes, she admits to learning on the run.

Her number one lesson?
“There is really no such thing as a stupid question or action. That’s the only way you can learn about something you know nothing about. “Ask, ask, ask. And give a big cheeky grin when you make a mistake, say sorry, and move on.”

Bessie reminds us
“…there is room for fresh blood in our farming future, and there are new, inspiring, exciting stories to be started from today… ”

READ BESSIE'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW BESSIE'S VIDEO HERE

READ ABOUT BESSIE IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


JO NEWTON

A thirst for learning and a passion for sheep took city-girl Jo Newton to Armidale in NSW to study agriculture. She is now studying a PhD exploring the factors that influence successful early reproductive performance in ewes. Jo proves that studying agriculture can lead to a world of opportunities and she shares her story at any opportunity. “As important a job as farming is, there are many different jobs in our sector,” she said.

“(That’s) something many people don't fully understand. I am proud of the agricultural sector and my small role in it and am happy to share my story with as many of city friends as I can.”

READ JO'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW JO'S VIDEO HERE


CASSIE BAILE

Cassie Baile is a fifth generation sheep farmer from Bendemeer in the New England region of New South Wales. Cassie now lives and works in Sydney, for Elders as a Wool Technical Support Officer at the Yennora Wool Selling Centre. She has begun auctioneering at the weekly Sydney Wool Sales and loving every minute of the diversity her job entails.

READ CASSIE'S BLOG POST HERE


ADELE OFFLEY

Adele Offley is a qualified Wool Classer with a lifelong passion for wool stemming from the fascination of watching the sheep being shorn and the wool sorted in the shearing shed growing up on the family farm.

“I would like to encourage everyone, regardless of background, to seriously consider agriculture as a career option. There is a huge diversity of roles and opportunities on offer in the agriculture sector.”

READ ADELE'S BLOG POST HERE VIEW ADELE'S VIDEO HERE


MAX EDWARDS

While Max Edwards had to be dragged off the farm, near Wellington NSW, and into school during his formative years, he now finds it is his decision to leave and learn. He is currently studying a Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience at The University of Sydney and, not surprisingly, completing his honours project back home on the family property.

“Although I am extremely eager to return to the land, I also have a burning desire to further develop farming technology and ensure it reaches the producers it would help the most,” Max says. “Along the way I plan to continue sharing my passion for wool production and inviting everyone I meet to come and see the world of Australian farmers and I hope when I am 86, like my Grandpa, I will be ringing my son and grandson to check “that everything is ready for shearing tomorrow”, still with great enthusiasm and always with the desire to improve the quality of our sheep and their wool.”

READ MAX'S BLOG POST HERE


CHLOE DUTSCHKE

Chloe Dutschke has taken a degree in Animal Science from The University of Adelaide and gone back to the beginning.

Keen to learn all she can about wool Chloe, from Clare in South Australia, has joined the supply chain at ground level working as a jillaroo for Bendleby Pastoral in the Flinders Ranges. “As I stood at the table skirting the wool, running my fingers along the fleece, I really began to appreciate the wondrous fibre that wool is,” Chloe says. And her experience already extends to international destinations. She has travelled to Indonesia to investigate the live export trade, and to Hong Kong to learn about wool’s final destination in the fashion market.

“The opportunities in the wool industry are endless and I am super excited to develop my passion and continue to educate myself as much as possible about this remarkable fibre that many generations have developed before me.

READ CHLOE'S BLOG POST HERE


FELICITY TAYLOR

Twenty year old Felicity Taylor is a 2015 NSW Farmers Cattle and Sheep Industry Young Farming Champion and sixth generation farmer from Moree, NSW. Felicity grew up on her family’s 10,000 acre wheat and cattle property north of Moree, before her family relocated to a smaller grazing property to the east of town, instilling a strong connection to the region. “I love the beautiful black soils, the locals walking down the main street and days spent swimming in the river,” she says.

Currently in her 2nd year of an agricultural economics degree at University of Sydney, Felicity says she is driven by maintaining the spirit of rural communities and promoting best practice farming while also seeing the great potential for profitable agricultural businesses.

“I thrive off the love of the land and dream of turning the soils the same way my family has always done, but always that little bit better all the time,” she says. “When I have a place of my own, I’m not going to be making choices on tradition or convention, but on the best decisions for my piece of land, combining the education and practical experience vital for a successful agricultural career.”

READ FELICITY'S BLOG POST HERE


LAURA PHELPS

Policy and research officer with Australian Pork Limited, Laura Phelps is a 2015 NSW Farmers Pork Industry Young Farming Champion. “I count the pigs,” says Laura, whose role involves tracking movements of livestock to ensure we can all have fresh, safe and healthy pork on our plates. “I’ve discovered a love for pigs that I never knew I had. They are powerhouses when it comes to producing protein, but also energy from manure – nothing is wasted.”

A “city-country hybrid” Laura spent her early childhood on a cattle property in northern NSW before her family moved to Melbourne when she was 10 years old. Fantastic opportunities arose from attending an ag-centric high school and Laura went on to study agricultural science at university.

“Travel throughout Asia working across areas such as nutrition in postnatal women, establishing community gardens, and pesticide safety management with farmers in mountain villages, Laura resonated with the “deep human connection to where food comes from, when it is the difference between health and starvation.”

"I am proof that there’s a future in agriculture,” Laura says. “I’m just one of the many young voices actively crafting a sustainable, ethical and healthy future for agriculture".

READ LAURA'S BLOG POST HERE


GEORGIA CLARK

Animal and Veterinary Bioscience student Georgia Clark has a passion for all things poultry. A few years ago the now 20-year-old began her own purebred poultry stud on a small farm near Lake Macquarie, NSW, with a focus on sustainability and the continuation of rare dual purpose and bantam breeds.
Heavily involved in the community, Georgia is chief steward of the poultry section at her local show – resurrecting the section after a 30 year show absence. In 2013 Georgia took home two Champion poultry titles at the Sydney Royal Easer Show, completed a 2013 Woolworth Agribusiness Scholarship, implemented a poultry unit at her local primary school and resurrected the local pony club.
Georgia also breeds Huacaya alpacas, and has a desire to expand into beef cattle – her family’s agricultural roots. She is a 2014 Royal Agricultural Society Rural Achiever, and a strong believer in encouraging young people to become involved in agriculture and their local communities.

“Relationships with the community are a perfect opportunity to promote agriculture as a career for people both young and old, and to connect and encourage young minds to the important opportunities and challenges of food and fibre production.”

READ GEORGIA'S BLOG POST HERE


DANILA MARINI

Danila Marini was a city kid from Adelaide who’d never set foot on a farm. Now she’s a second year PhD student researching sheep. The interest was sparked at just 9 years old, when Danila’s dad started a small hobby farm. After high school she completed a Bachelor of Animal Science at Adelaide University. A combined love of sheep and research lead her to pursue a PhD project focussed on animal welfare. The catch? She had to move cross country to Armidale, NSW, where you’ll find her today – training sheep to self-administer pain relief drugs.

“Many think I’m mad having gone on to do a PhD, some days I think I am too, but thanks to the support from family, friends and my supervisors at CSIRO and UNE, I am so glad I have started this journey. So here’s to a future of research, helping the agricultural sector and helping animals!”

READ DANILA'S BLOG POST HERE


KYLIE SCHULLER

In 2001 my family started our shorthorn herd, “Outback Shorthorns”. We don’t have generations of farming history, and we don’t even own any land. But like other primary producers we love what we do and work hard to produce cattle that results in the healthiest and tastiest beef possible sitting on the consumer’s plate. We take pride in providing beef to our local butcher and enjoy being able to connect directly with our consumers in this way.

READ KYLIE'S BLOG POST HERE

READ ABOUT KYLIE IN LEADING AGRICULTURE HERE


TEGAN NOCK

Agriculture has allowed Tegan to combine her love of science and business to create a career focusing on productivity and sustainability. With a particular interest in conservation farming she operates a wheat property with her family in the central west of NSW, along with managing ‘Yandilla Angus’. Acting as the Chair of the NSW Young Farmers Council, Tegan spends her spare time advocating for the future of agriculture on behalf of the youth in NSW.